Design Talk

Design Styles

Think The Great Gatsby, and all of its glamorous mansions and cars. Art déco styles are made to resemble glamorous skyscrapers, theaters, and mansions from the 40’s and 50’s, with metallic or primary colours in solid line patterns to give feelings of wealth and class.

Art Deco

[ärt•de•kō]

These designs are completely carefree, mixing several patterns and textures to become something totally unique from more uniform styles. Bohemian looks have personalized designs, colours, and combinations, expressing everything you want the world to see.

Bohemian

[bō•hē•mē•ən]

Everything floral and from the forest! Botanical styles often involve leaves and floral colours on calming backgrounds, with patterns that feature illustrations of crisp leaves and thriving plant life. In essence, your bed will feel like a relaxing garden.

Botanical

[bə•ta•ni•kəl]

The goal of any coastal design is to make you feel like you’re calmly laying by the beach. Some take this literally by using sandy beiges and ocean-like blues and greens, but others are more metaphorically coastal with waving textures and cool colour palettes.

Coastal

[koh•stl]

Contemporary designs are here to take you to the future! They still capture the uncluttered styles of the modern designs, but with more subdued tonals, metallic accents, and detailed weaves that feel new, unique, and evolved.

Contemporary

[kən•tem•pə•rer•ē]

French country styles usually have a little more class than your typical common country cabin look. This theme is taken straight from cottages in the French countryside with many wooden and neutral tones, but tosses in soft colours and polished patterns like gingham, ditsy florals and stripes, giving its rustic features some brighter company!

French Country

[french•kən-trē]

Perfect for lofts, warehouses, and other unusual living spaces! Industrial themes are usually quite flat and simple, striking a perfect balance between tasteful and practical. They’re also prepared to take a lot of sunlight, since their ideal rooms have high ceilings and tall windows.

Industrial

[in•də•strē•əl]

Inspired by sun-kissed places and slow-living, this design trend has its roots in Spain, Italy, and Greece. Think warm, earthy neutrals paired with tones that echo the sea and sky, made with natural materials and fittingly fine craftsmanship.

Mediterranean

[me•də•tə•rā•nē•ən]

If your sense of style is all about the right here, right now, you’ll melt for modern designs. This aesthetic usually involves sleek, clean, and simple designs from the 1950’s to the present day, with natural wood grain colours and minimal decorative features to satisfy your modern sensibilities.

Modern

[mä•dərn]

Inspired by popular furniture styles from Sweden and Norway, Scandinavian designs are extremely minimalist, and usually lean on restrained neutral colours. They usually fit nicely in any sort of room, and they’re easy to accessorize with bright or eccentric accessories!

Scandinavian

[skan•də•nā•vē•ən]

The charm of an antique with the polish of a new design! Shabby chic is all about designs that look like they have some years on them. For bedding, this often means having a vintage look with more traditional styles and patterns, but still crisp and fresh like any new linen set.

Shabby Chic

[sha•bē•shēk]

Transitional designs are here to bring you through time, taking a little from the future and a little from the past! They tend to have a mix of traditional and modern features, such as having tasteful classical embroidery on a more modern dark pattern.

Transitional

[tran(t)•ˈsish•nəl]

Welcome to the jungle! Unlike simpler botanical designs, tropical designs showcase a fuller natural environment, full of thick green palm fronds and bright blooming flowers. Some tropical designs can have relatively calm colour palettes, but tropical styles are far less subtle than your usual nature-inspired design.

Tropical

[trä•pi•kəl]

Art Deco

[ärt•de•kō]

Think The Great Gatsby, and all of its glamorous mansions and cars. Art déco styles are made to resemble glamorous skyscrapers, theaters, and mansions from the 40’s and 50’s, with metallic or primary colours in solid line patterns to give feelings of wealth and class.

Bohemian

[bō•hē•mē•ən]

These designs are completely carefree, mixing several patterns and textures to become something totally unique from more uniform styles. Bohemian looks have personalized designs, colours, and combinations, expressing everything you want the world to see.

Botanical

[bə•ta•ni•kəl]

Everything floral and from the forest! Botanical styles often involve leaves and floral colours on calming backgrounds, with patterns that feature illustrations of crisp leaves and thriving plant life. In essence, your bed will feel like a relaxing garden.

Coastal

[koh•stl]

The goal of any coastal design is to make you feel like you’re calmly laying by the beach. Some take this literally by using sandy beiges and ocean-like blues and greens, but others are more metaphorically coastal with waving textures and cool colour palettes.

Contemporary

[kən•tem•pə•rer•ē]

Contemporary designs are here to take you to the future! They still capture the uncluttered styles of the modern designs, but with more subdued tonals, metallic accents, and detailed weaves that feel new, unique, and evolved.

French Country

[french•kən-trē]

French country styles usually have a little more class than your typical common country cabin look. This theme is taken straight from cottages in the French countryside with many wooden and neutral tones, but tosses in soft colours and polished patterns like gingham, ditsy florals and stripes, giving its rustic features some brighter company!

Industrial

[in•də•strē•əl]

Perfect for lofts, warehouses, and other unusual living spaces! Industrial themes are usually quite flat and simple, striking a perfect balance between tasteful and practical. They’re also prepared to take a lot of sunlight, since their ideal rooms have high ceilings and tall windows.

Mediterranean

[me•də•tə•rā•nē•ən]

Inspired by sun-kissed places and slow-living, this design trend has its roots in Spain, Italy, and Greece. Think warm, earthy neutrals paired with tones that echo the sea and sky, made with natural materials and fittingly fine craftsmanship.

Modern

[mä•dərn]

If your sense of style is all about the right here, right now, you’ll melt for modern designs. This aesthetic usually involves sleek, clean, and simple designs from the 1950’s to the present day, with natural wood grain colours and minimal decorative features to satisfy your modern sensibilities.

Scandinavian

[skan•də•nā•vē•ən]

Inspired by popular furniture styles from Sweden and Norway, Scandinavian designs are extremely minimalist, and usually lean on restrained neutral colours. They usually fit nicely in any sort of room, and they’re easy to accessorize with bright or eccentric accessories!

Shabby Chic

[sha•bē•shēk]

The charm of an antique with the polish of a new design! Shabby chic is all about designs that look like they have some years on them. For bedding, this often means having a vintage look with more traditional styles and patterns, but still crisp and fresh like any new linen set.

Transitional

[tran(t)•ˈsish•nəl]

Transitional designs are here to bring you through time, taking a little from the future and a little from the past! They tend to have a mix of traditional and modern features, such as having tasteful classical embroidery on a more modern dark pattern.

Tropical

[trä•pi•kəl]

Welcome to the jungle! Unlike simpler botanical designs, tropical designs showcase a fuller natural environment, full of thick green palm fronds and bright blooming flowers. Some tropical designs can have relatively calm colour palettes, but tropical styles are far less subtle than your usual nature-inspired design.

Design Elements

Set a scroll across your bed! An arabesque design typically involves interlacing foliage, tendrils, or plain lines in a scrolling pattern. It’s inspired and named after classic Arabic designs, which involved long and detailed prints that could span across lengthy fabrics.

Arabesque

[a•rə•besk]

An ancient embroidery technique used around the world that still impresses to this day! Like the name implies, this stitch creates its eye-catching effect by looping back on itself over and over again, resulting in a timeless textured effect.

Chain Stitch

[chān•stich]

Colour-block print designs can make a statement in the bedroom. They often feature oversized geometric shapes in linear or random layouts either in contrasting colours or more subtle tone-on-tone shades.

Colour-Block

[kə•lər•bläk]

Cute, classic, and crafty! Embroidery involves creating raised, ornamental designs with thread, yarn, or other materials for intricate floral designs. It even has space for some unusual accessories like pearls, beads, or sequins sewn right in for some extra detail.

Embroidery

[im•brȯi•d(ə•)rē]

The differences in Ombré are literally night and day! This look involves blending one hue into another, typically moving from light to dark. Ombré is a great way to use vastly different shades of the same colour all within the same fabric.

Ombré

[äm•brā]

Even though paisley is named after a Scottish town, this popular textile design actually comes from Persia! It usually involves ornamental tear-drops put in symmetrical styles, each with a unique curve that frames complex lines and diverse colours.

Paisley

[pāz•lē]

Putting a little bit of everything together! Patchwork designs are meant to resemble patchwork quilts, where different types and colours of fabric are stitched together. They can often feature patches with several diverse sizes and colours, but others can include gorgeous and consistent themes through complimentary patches.

Patchwork

[pach•wərk]

A pick stitch is a series of widely spaced, small back stitches that poke out of the fabric. It’s usually used to give a modern look to stitch-heavy linents, making it look more textured when it simply has more visible threads!

Pickstitch

[pic•stiCH]

Most stitching is done to put things together, but top stitching is entirely about sewing lines for decoration. These are lines made with thread to create memorable designs and add depth, such as the brighter gold threads you’ll find along the pockets of denim blue jeans!

Top Stitching

[täp•stich]

Arabesque

[a•rə•besk]

Set a scroll across your bed! An arabesque design typically involves interlacing foliage, tendrils, or plain lines in a scrolling pattern. It’s inspired and named after classic Arabic designs, which involved long and detailed prints that could span across lengthy fabrics.

Chain Stitch

[chān•stich]

An ancient embroidery technique used around the world that still impresses to this day! Like the name implies, this stitch creates its eye-catching effect by looping back on itself over and over again, resulting in a timeless textured effect.

Colour-Block

[kə•lər•bläk]

Colour-block print designs can make a statement in the bedroom. They often feature oversized geometric shapes in linear or random layouts either in contrasting colours or more subtle tone-on-tone shades.

Embroidery

[im•brȯi•d(ə•)rē]

Cute, classic, and crafty! Embroidery involves creating raised, ornamental designs with thread, yarn, or other materials for intricate floral designs. It even has space for some unusual accessories like pearls, beads, or sequins sewn right in for some extra detail.

Ombré

[äm•brā]

The differences in Ombré are literally night and day! This look involves blending one hue into another, typically moving from light to dark. Ombré is a great way to use vastly different shades of the same colour all within the same fabric.

Paisley

[pāz•lē]

Even though paisley is named after a Scottish town, this popular textile design actually comes from Persia! It usually involves ornamental tear-drops put in symmetrical styles, each with a unique curve that frames complex lines and diverse colours.

Patchwork

[pach•wərk]

Putting a little bit of everything together! Patchwork designs are meant to resemble patchwork quilts, where different types and colours of fabric are stitched together. They can often feature patches with several diverse sizes and colours, but others can include gorgeous and consistent themes through complimentary patches.

Pickstitch

[pic•stiCH]

A pick stitch is a series of widely spaced, small back stitches that poke out of the fabric. It’s usually used to give a modern look to stitch-heavy linents, making it look more textured when it simply has more visible threads!

Top Stitching

[täp•stich]

Most stitching is done to put things together, but top stitching is entirely about sewing lines for decoration. These are lines made with thread to create memorable designs and add depth, such as the brighter gold threads you’ll find along the pockets of denim blue jeans!

Fabric Construction

It’s tufted, it’s fuzzy, and it’s French for caterpillar! Chenille fabric is traditionally made by treating strips of tufted wool with heat rollers. Just like its name suggests, Chenille feels as soft as an adorable caterpillar.

Chenille

[shə•nēl]

Adding some shape to style! This type of jacquard weave involves cutting the threads on the surface of the fabric, giving the face of the fabric a fringed and frayed look, and setting it apart from more flat and traditional garments.

Clipped Jacquard

[klipt•ja•kärd]

Peekaboo! This type of lace is created by punching small holes in a fabric, often in a floral pattern to give it a more traditional theme. Since it features clear holes through the fabric, you can see right through the pattern!

Eyelet Fabric

[ī•lət•fa•brik]

It’s woven, it’s textured, and classically colourful. Jacquards are fabrics made on a loom where the pattern is woven directly into the fabric with coloured yarns, rather than being painted over the fabric after it’s made.

Jacquard

[ja•kärd]

Also known as the broken twill weave, herringbone describes a weaving pattern that looks like the bones of herring fish 一 hence the name! Herringbone can be distinguished by its broken and staggered zigzag, while other v-shaped patterns tend to be clean and even.

Herringbone

[her•ing•bōn]

It’s patterned, it’s puckered, it’s French for quilted! Matelassé fabric was invented to mimic hand-stitched quilts made in Marseilles, France. The surface can often look similar to a standard quilt, but it usually has greater weight to help it elegantly drape over furniture.

Matelassé

[mät•ə•lä•sā]

The technique uses knotting 一 rather than weaving or knitting 一 to create ornamental decorations and detailed embellishments. This leads to especially thick and loose designs that look more homemade and rustic, just as if you knotted it together yourself!

Macramé

[maf•krəf•mā]

This style of cloth is named from the Persian phrase “shir-o-shakar” 一 meaning “milk and sugar” 一 to signify its alternating textures! Seersucker fabric is woven on a loom with threads at different tensions, leading to ruffled textures. The mixed textures also improve air circulation, making them great choices for warmer climates!

Seersucker

[sir•sə•kər]

Soft and distressed in all the right ways. Traditionally, stonewashing is a process where fabric is placed in a rotating drum with pumice stones. This gives the colours of the fabric a naturally faded and low-maintenance look!

Stone Washed

[stōn•wȯsht]

Get ready for a soft, fuzzy, textural treat! Tufted features involve thick cotton yarns sticking out through a woven cotton base, making a frayed and raised design. One of the most common ways to do this is by pulling the yarn through the fabric before it’s cut and frayed!

Tufted

[tə•f•tid]

It’s repeating, it’s three dimensional, it’s textured like a waffle! Waffle weaves consist of small rectangles formed by raised threads. This type of fabric is still quite smooth, but it has a natural texture to it that makes it feel more firm and heavy.

Waffle Weave

[wä•fəl•wēv]

Rather than colouring fabrics after they’ve been made, Yarn dyeing is a process where each yarn is batch-dyed to a specific colour before it’s even been woven into a fabric. Different combinations of coloured yarns can even be woven into unique patterns!

Yarn Dye

[yärn•dī]

Chenille

[shə•nēl]

It’s tufted, it’s fuzzy, and it’s French for caterpillar! Chenille fabric is traditionally made by treating strips of tufted wool with heat rollers. Just like its name suggests, Chenille feels as soft as an adorable caterpillar.

Clipped Jacquard

[klipt•ja•kärd]

Adding some shape to style! This type of jacquard weave involves cutting the threads on the surface of the fabric, giving the face of the fabric a fringed and frayed look, and setting it apart from more flat and traditional garments.

Eyelet Fabric

[ī•lət•fa•brik]

Peekaboo! This type of lace is created by punching small holes in a fabric, often in a floral pattern to give it a more traditional theme. Since it features clear holes through the fabric, you can see right through the pattern!

Jacquard

[ja•kärd]

It’s woven, it’s textured, and classically colourful. Jacquards are fabrics made on a loom where the pattern is woven directly into the fabric with coloured yarns, rather than being painted over the fabric after it’s made.

Herringbone

[her•ing•bōn]

Also known as the broken twill weave, herringbone describes a weaving pattern that looks like the bones of herring fish 一 hence the name! Herringbone can be distinguished by its broken and staggered zigzag, while other v-shaped patterns tend to be clean and even.

Matelassé

[mät•ə•lä•sā]

It’s patterned, it’s puckered, it’s French for quilted! Matelassé fabric was invented to mimic hand-stitched quilts made in Marseilles, France. The surface can often look similar to a standard quilt, but it usually has greater weight to help it elegantly drape over furniture.

Macramé

[maf•krəf•mā]

The technique uses knotting 一 rather than weaving or knitting 一 to create ornamental decorations and detailed embellishments. This leads to especially thick and loose designs that look more homemade and rustic, just as if you knotted it together yourself!

Seersucker

[sir•sə•kər]

This style of cloth is named from the Persian phrase “shir-o-shakar” 一 meaning “milk and sugar” 一 to signify its alternating textures! Seersucker fabric is woven on a loom with threads at different tensions, leading to ruffled textures. The mixed textures also improve air circulation, making them great choices for warmer climates!

Stone Washed

[stōn•wȯsht]

Soft and distressed in all the right ways. Traditionally, stonewashing is a process where fabric is placed in a rotating drum with pumice stones. This gives the colours of the fabric a naturally faded and low-maintenance look!

Tufted

[tə•f•tid]

Get ready for a soft, fuzzy, textural treat! Tufted features involve thick cotton yarns sticking out through a woven cotton base, making a frayed and raised design. One of the most common ways to do this is by pulling the yarn through the fabric before it’s cut and frayed!

Waffle Weave

[wä•fəl•wēv]

It’s repeating, it’s three dimensional, it’s textured like a waffle! Waffle weaves consist of small rectangles formed by raised threads. This type of fabric is still quite smooth, but it has a natural texture to it that makes it feel more firm and heavy.

Yarn Dye

[yärn•dī]

Rather than colouring fabrics after they’ve been made, Yarn dyeing is a process where each yarn is batch-dyed to a specific colour before it’s even been woven into a fabric. Different combinations of coloured yarns can even be woven into unique patterns!

Weaves

Simple and crisp! Percale weaves have a clean matte finish, with a consistent pattern of threads going over one thread and under the next. Think of it like a crisp white shirt ー light, breathable, and securely constructed.

Percale Weave

[pər•kāl•wēv]

Sateen weaves have much smoother sheen on their surface, as each thread goes under three threads and only over one. To have a solid surface, this means they usually have much tighter weaving than percale weaves, meaning they can hold in heat much easier on cold nights.

Sateen Weave

[sa•tēn•wēv]

Weaves tend to refer to how the threads of a fabric are put together. Look closely at any fabric, and you’ll see threads going in one direction on the front and the opposite on the back. These weave in and out of each other to help create a firm surface of threads!

Weave

[wēv]

Percale Weave

[pər•kāl•wēv]

Simple and crisp! Percale weaves have a clean matte finish, with a consistent pattern of threads going over one thread and under the next. Think of it like a crisp white shirt ー light, breathable, and securely constructed.

Sateen Weave

[sa•tēn•wēv]

Sateen weaves have much smoother sheen on their surface, as each thread goes under three threads and only over one. To have a solid surface, this means they usually have much tighter weaving than percale weaves, meaning they can hold in heat much easier on cold nights.

Weave

[wēv]

Weaves tend to refer to how the threads of a fabric are put together. Look closely at any fabric, and you’ll see threads going in one direction on the front and the opposite on the back. These weave in and out of each other to help create a firm surface of threads!

Product Finishings

Finished with flair! Hemstitches are decorative edges of linens, sealing the weave with something to keep the threads together. Sometimes this is done with tidy touches like embroidery, unusual textures, or even unique features like knotted threads!

Hemstitch

[hem•stich]

While knife edge pillows have a seam on the inside, flanged edge pillows wear their seams on their sleeves. The fill of these pillows is sealed by stitching directly over the exterior, leaving a decorative flap of fabric around the edge like a cuddly ravioli!

Flanged Edge

[flanjd•ej]

As violent as it might sound, knife edges are actually just the cleanest and simplest ways to attach fabrics together. These just involve a standard seam inside the garment, making it look as if a knife had been gently run across it to make the lines around the edges!

Knife Edge

​ [nīf•ej]

Pillows with piped edges have a rounded trim around the border of the cushion, like smooth icing around the edge of a cake! It’s made by folding fabric to make a sort of smooth “pipe”, giving the edge a little more definition and keeping the seams hidden with style.

Piped Edge

[pīpt•ej]

Curvy and playful all around! Scalloped edge pillows have a unique design of half-moons around the border of a pillow, covering up the seam with something fun and decorative to add a little whimsy.

Scalloped Edge

[skä•ləpt•ej]

Hemstitch

[hem•stich]

Finished with flair! Hemstitches are decorative edges of linens, sealing the weave with something to keep the threads together. Sometimes this is done with tidy touches like embroidery, unusual textures, or even unique features like knotted threads!

Flanged Edge

[flanjd•ej]

While knife edge pillows have a seam on the inside, flanged edge pillows wear their seams on their sleeves. The fill of these pillows is sealed by stitching directly over the exterior, leaving a decorative flap of fabric around the edge like a cuddly ravioli!

Knife Edge

[nīf•ej]

As violent as it might sound, knife edges are actually just the cleanest and simplest ways to attach fabrics together. These just involve a standard seam inside the garment, making it look as if a knife had been gently run across it to make the lines around the edges!

Piped Edge

[pīpt•ej]

Pillows with piped edges have a rounded trim around the border of the cushion, like smooth icing around the edge of a cake! It’s made by folding fabric to make a sort of smooth “pipe”, giving the edge a little more definition and keeping the seams hidden with style.

Scalloped Edge

[skä•ləpt•ej]

Curvy and playful all around! Scalloped edge pillows have a unique design of half-moons around the border of a pillow, covering up the seam with something fun and decorative to add a little whimsy.

Closures

These types of pillow closures have a snug flap on the inside to hold the pillow in place. This keeps it from falling out of the opening while you sleep, and also prevents the pillowcase from rolling up thanks to the tighter fit!

Envelope Closure

[en•və•lōp•klō•zhər]

Envelope Closure

[en•və•lōp•klō•zhər]

These types of pillow closures have a snug flap on the inside to hold the pillow in place. This keeps it from falling out of the opening while you sleep, and also prevents the pillowcase from rolling up thanks to the tighter fit!

Printing Methods

Panel printing is an automated version of a classic style called silkscreen printing, where flat panel screens press colour directly onto sections of fabric. Originally, these screens were pressed by hand, but nowadays, machines are used to press colour deeper into the fabric!

Panel Print

[pa•nəl•print]

New technology brings new ways to print patterns! Digital textile printing uses small drops of ink through print heads onto a fabric, just like any ink-jet paper printers. Since the inks are mixed to make multi-coloured designs, you can get tons of unique colours all at once!

Digital Print

[di•jə•təl•print]

Smooth and continuous printing! With rotary printing, ink is printed directly through a continuously rotating cylindrical screen, which rolls over the fabric to paint over it. Since the ink is put right onto the fabric, it can lead to some especially bright and strong looks!

Rotary Print

[rō•tə•rē•print]

Panel Print

[pa•nəl•print]

Panel printing is an automated version of a classic style called silkscreen printing, where flat panel screens press colour directly onto sections of fabric. Originally, these screens were pressed by hand, but nowadays, machines are used to press colour deeper into the fabric!

Digital Print

[di•jə•təl•print]

New technology brings new ways to print patterns! Digital textile printing uses small drops of ink through print heads onto a fabric, just like any ink-jet paper printers. Since the inks are mixed to make multi-coloured designs, you can get tons of unique colours all at once!

Rotary Print

[rō•tə•rē•print]

Smooth and continuous printing! With rotary printing, ink is printed directly through a continuously rotating cylindrical screen, which rolls over the fabric to paint over it. Since the ink is put right onto the fabric, it can lead to some especially bright and strong looks!

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